Global Warming: Man or Myth?

Scientists can also wear their citizen hats

Archive for June 2010

O Water, Water, Wherefore Art Thou Water?

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This is the third part of the Impacts of Climate Change series. See Climate Change: The Coming Crisis and Global Warming: A Sea Change for the first two parts.

Freshwater availability is vital to civilization because it provides drinking water and water for irrigation to feed society. “Observational records and climate projections provide abundant evidence that freshwater resources are vulnerable and have the potential to be strongly impacted by climate change, with wide-ranging consequences for human societies and ecosystems” is the conclusion of Bates, et al. (2008) in Climate Change and Water, a Technical Paper of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, WG II (2007).

Bates et al. find:

  • Observed warming over several decades has been linked to changes in the large-scale hydrological cycle.
  • Climate model simulations for the 21st century are consistent in projecting precipitation increases in high latitudes (very likely) and parts of the tropics, and decreases in some subtropical and lower mid-latitude regions (likely).
  • By the middle of the 21st century, annual average river runoff and water availability are projected to increase as a result of climate change at high latitudes and in some wet tropical areas, and decrease over some dry regions at mid-latitudes and in the dry tropics.
  • Increased precipitation intensity and variability are projected to increase the risks of flooding and drought
    in many areas.
  • Water supplies stored in glaciers and snow cover are projected to decline in the course of the century.
  • Higher water temperatures and changes in extremes, including floods and droughts, are projected to affect water quality and exacerbate many forms of water pollution.
  • Globally, the negative impacts of future climate change on freshwater systems are expected to outweigh the benefits (high confidence).
  • Changes in water quantity and quality due to climate change are expected to affect food availability, stability, access and utilisation.

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Written by Scott Mandia

June 28, 2010 at 6:00 am

Posted in Uncategorized

Global Warming: A Sea Change

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“The coastlines of the United States and the world are major centers of economic, social, and cultural development, and coastal areas are home to critical ecological and environmental resources. Climate change poses a number of risks to coastal environments. Foremost among these is sea level rise, which threatens people, ecosystems, and infrastructure directly and also magnifies the impacts of coastal storms.” — National Research Council (2010)

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Written by Scott Mandia

June 21, 2010 at 6:00 am

Posted in Uncategorized

And You Think the Oil Spill is Bad?

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The latest estimate of the amount of oil being spilled per day in the Gulf of Mexico is 40,000 barrels per day.  This is an epic disaster that we are all angry and saddened by.  We should be!  Many lives have been upended by the economic hardship that the spill has caused to Gulf Coast residents and marine and coastal ecosystems have been damaged for decades.

We should be angrier and sadder by our everyday carbon emissions, but we are not.  We are not because most of us do not understand the scale of carbon emissions nor can we see any immediate negative effects. 

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Written by Scott Mandia

June 17, 2010 at 6:28 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Climate Change: The Coming Crisis

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My Global Warming Man or Myth – The Science of Climate Change Web site was designed to show the average person why scientists agree that the climate is warming and that humans are mostly responsible.  The next phase of the site will highlight the likely impacts of a rapidly warming world.  As I develop these new pages, I will be posting them here hoping for your feedback to improve on the content.  Once all of the impact pages are ready, I will publish them to the Web.

The General Overview page is the first of these blog posts.

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Written by Scott Mandia

June 13, 2010 at 6:45 am

Posted in Uncategorized

The 800 lb. Gorilla in the Ocean

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When most of us think of climate change and global warming we think of the atmosphere –  warmest decades on record recently, atmospheric CO2 at record levels and climbing, increased floods, droughts, hurricanes, melting glaciers, etc.  When we do speak about the oceans, it is typically about heat content, Arctic ice melt, and sea level rise. However, the 800 lb. gorilla in the room just might be ocean acidification.

The ocean has absorbed about half of all the anthropogenic (human) carbon emissions since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution (Doney, 2006).  The CO2 that the oceans absorb is causing a lower pH which means the oceans are moving toward more acidic conditions.  The consequences could be dire.
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Written by Scott Mandia

June 6, 2010 at 7:48 am

Posted in Uncategorized

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